Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Wildwalkerwoman

Dedicated to everyone who makes up their own mind
Sep 20 '14

there-was-no-other-sound:

rnultiplayer:

wanna know what a cow looks like washed and blow dried?

image

image

that is what a cow looks like washed and blow dried

FLUFFY MILK HORSE

(Source: rnultiplayer)

Sep 20 '14

durnesque-esque:

alltheworldsbackstage:

My Costumer taught me his bitter song, and it is guaranteed to make you feel better, especially if sang with a group of people joining in. So I thought I’d share it for any of you who might need it

If you’re bitter and you’re jaded clap your hands

If you’re bitter and you’re jaded clap your hands

If you’re bitter and sadistic and about to go balistic

If you’re bitter and you’re jaded clap your hands

image

Sep 18 '14
Sep 18 '14
"The key to understanding the positive influence of diversity is the concept of informational diversity. When people are brought together to solve problems in groups, they bring different information, opinions and perspectives. This makes obvious sense when we talk about diversity of disciplinary backgrounds—think again of the interdisciplinary team building a car. The same logic applies to social diversity. People who are different from one another in race, gender and other dimensions bring unique information and experiences to bear on the task at hand. A male and a female engineer might have perspectives as different from one another as an engineer and a physicist—and that is a good thing."
(via wildcat2030)
Sep 18 '14
euthanizeallwhitepeople:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 
Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 
"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 
Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 
"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 
Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.
Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 
Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 
Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.
A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.
Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.
Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.
I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.
A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. See more here. 


I’d heard a lot about Canada being less than kosher in their dealings with Canadian Aboriginals, but this is really disgusting.
-YJ-

euthanizeallwhitepeople:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 

Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 

"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 

Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 

"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 

Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.

Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 

Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 

Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.

A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.

Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.

Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.

I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.

A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.


Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. 

See more here. 

I’d heard a lot about Canada being less than kosher in their dealings with Canadian Aboriginals, but this is really disgusting.

-YJ-

Sep 18 '14
smdxn:

Ayn Rand-Inspired Libertarian Utopia Implodes Almost Instantly. Who Could Have Predicted?

[F]or some reason, the Middle Earthers of Rand’s world were surprised when one of their own scammed them. It’s not as though anyone could have seen that coming… [Libertarians] are SO MAD about the thing happening that they could have seen coming a mile away — if only they’d actually read the thousand-page book they’ve built their entire lives around…
Not that anybody here is claiming to be the first with this idea. Galt’s Gulch Chile didn’t exactly come out of a vacuum; right next door is “Freedom Orchard,” and down the street is “Sovereign Farms.” All Libertarian utopias, all about as economically dysfunctional and with all the social infighting and hatred that you’d expect.
Still that didn’t keep Ron Paul from visiting, and praising them.
Chilean Libertarian paradise, you say? No economy, and overpriced land, inhabited entirely by selfish sociopaths, you say? What could go wrong with that?

smdxn:

Ayn Rand-Inspired Libertarian Utopia Implodes Almost Instantly. Who Could Have Predicted?

[F]or some reason, the Middle Earthers of Rand’s world were surprised when one of their own scammed them. It’s not as though anyone could have seen that coming… [Libertarians] are SO MAD about the thing happening that they could have seen coming a mile away — if only they’d actually read the thousand-page book they’ve built their entire lives around…

Not that anybody here is claiming to be the first with this idea. Galt’s Gulch Chile didn’t exactly come out of a vacuum; right next door is “Freedom Orchard,” and down the street is “Sovereign Farms.” All Libertarian utopias, all about as economically dysfunctional and with all the social infighting and hatred that you’d expect.

Still that didn’t keep Ron Paul from visiting, and praising them.

Chilean Libertarian paradise, you say? No economy, and overpriced land, inhabited entirely by selfish sociopaths, you say? What could go wrong with that?

(via smdxn)
Sep 15 '14

budzaya:

"Why is it always the woman who has to see past the beast in the man? Why does she always have to clean his wounds, even after he has damaged her beyond repair? Why is it always the man who is worthy of forgiveness for being a monster? I want to see the beast in the beauty. The half smile, half snarl. The unapologetic anger. I would like to see the man forgive the monster. To see her, blood and all, and love her anyway." — Beauty & the Beast, Caitlyn S.

(via budzaya)
Sep 9 '14
Sep 9 '14

systematicgenocide:

Watch: US Broadcaster Utterly Destroys Israel Apologist…With Logic

US broadcaster Mike Malloy has responded to the standard Israeli apologist line “what would you do if rockets were being fired into your country?’ with an impassioned and logical argument so perfect it should be replayed over every news channel across the world.

Here it is in all it’s glory:

Israel versus Palestine is portrayed as a ‘Middle East Conflict’.  But this is as much the ‘Middle East Conflict’ as Apartheid South Africa was the ‘Sub Saharan Africa Conflict’.

The framing of this situation as a ‘conflict’ prevents many from seeing the scale of malevolence playing itself out within Israel’s 1948, 1967 and 2014 borders.

Having long been a two-state solutionist, I was surprised while recently on assignment in Israel and Gaza to have my own views challenged.   In interviews with ‘radical’ Israeli activists, I was pulled up on what they noticed as my own willingness to overlook colonialism in the case of Israel.  As Roni, a Jewish-Israeli conscientious objector and Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaigner told me over coffee in Tel Aviv:

“The Zionist project, particularly in Palestine, is a supremacist project. It’s not only a colonialist movement in that it demands the theft of resources, natural and human, of the indigenous people…But also says that this land is ours and only ours; and if you are not part of us you don’t belong here”

This is not a conflict.  It is a racist, colonial occupation.

Not only has Israel occupied Palestinian lands from 1948 onward, but in order to continue to expand, it perpetrates ceaseless brutality upon those who don’t belong, including:

As an illegally occupied people, Palestinians have the right to self defense – to repel and expel the occupying forces.

Israel is not defending itself – it is defending its occupation.

The answer is simple: Israel must end its illegal occupation of Palestine.  Until the day it does, it has zero claim to the peace and justice is refuses to grant to Palestinians.

ARTICLE

Sep 6 '14

themuselim:

sosuperawesome:

Dilara Yarci, on Tumblr

I’m absolutely in love with this type of art. I love the mathematical nature of it.

(Source: sosuperawesome)